It’s at least nicer than calling them “pigs.” The fuzz still wasn’t a super complimentary term, however. That means something is really, really cool. ’60s Slang: 13 Popular Words And Phrases From Everyone’s Favorite Decade. I.e. It's not literally outside your field of vision or defying gravity. REVELIST - It is a compliment. MAMÁSLATINAS -

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Everyone knows about “psychedelic,” “groovy,” and “fab,” but how many of these more obscure examples of slang from the ’60s do you remember using? We use cookies to ensure that we give you the best experience on our website. Money was called “scratch” or “bread,” something Audrey Hepburn’s character in Breakfast at Tiffany’s would need a lot of to purchase one of the items at the jewelry store. “Bippy” referred to someone’s butt. BABY NAME WIZARD. And like any other decade it had its own lingo and cultural slang. Learn more about our, Wikimedia commons/National Archives of Norway, Wikimedia Commons/Municipal Archives of Trondheim, Wikimedia Commons/Dutch National Archives, iy_2020; im_11; id_11; ih_04; imh_40; i_epoch:1605098454033, py_2020; pm_11; pd_02; ph_14; pmh_12; p_epoch:1604355128308, link-block-publisher; link-block-publisher_link-block-publisher; bodystr, pn_tstr:Mon Nov 02 14:12:08 PST 2020; pn_epoch:1604355128308. Take a look for a trip down memory lane with all the charming words and phrases folks used back in the day. S.E. On the flipside, a bummer is something that makes you sad or upset. It became popular even before Goldie Hawn used it on a regular basis on Rowan & Martin’s Laugh-In. Social unrest, an unpopular war, civil rights abuses, growing drug usage and a general distrust of Government provided plenty to draw from for 1960s slang lingo. Jess grew up in Oklahoma before moving to New York to become a writer. Be sure to SHARE the blast from the past with your friends on Facebook! I’m honestly considering bringing more than a few of them back for my own vocabulary! WWW.FIFTIESWEB.COM is a creation of RichWeb and is not endorsed or sponsored by or affiliated with any of the products, services, programs, celebrities or entities mentioned herein. PART OF WILD SKY MEDIA | FAMILY & PARENTING, LITTLETHINGS - Email it to me and I’ll credit the addition to you! It came from their song “Jumpin’ Jack Flash” with the repeated line, “it’s a gas, gas, gas.” And it was quick to catch on and long to stick around.
It just hits the nail right on the head. //-->. In the 1950’s we wore circle skirts and did the twist. Michael Rich. Slang D-H A bag was what someone’s scene was, like a mod or a rocker.

Please help us improve LittleThings by taking our short survey. Thank you for subscribing to our Push Notifications, Instantly get the most heartwarming & meaningful stories. All rights reserved. 72 points - added 10 years … I still use this word!

Start using these again and see who else remembers them. John Lennon later wrote a song called “Bagism,” admonishing the phrase for pigeonholing people into stereotypes. Something that was wonderful would be "outta sight" (so great or unbelievable, you just couldn't take it all in.) (Please mention if you think it would fit better in 1960s Slang or 1950s Slang), Slang A-C Here are some of the most popular slang terms from the ’60s and what they mean: If you’ve ever heard someone say something or someone is “far out” or “out of sight”, that means the thing or person is cool. If you find someone very sexy, you might call them “foxy.”. In 1960s slang, if something is far out or "out of sight," it's meant as a compliment. It can also mean you just really like something. If they did, though, that would be very “sosh” of them. //-->, NEXT: Slang D-H 7 — and I’ve definitely used No. Nov 19, 2017. “That’s a drag” will probably be around for the long haul. Most of what you’ll read here is unique to the sixties, some however are words or phrases that were popular in the past but took on new meanings in this decade. Cool Head.

This was heard frequently on Dragnet to refer to police officers. This phrase is asking you if you understand what the person is saying. This was how you would ask someone if they agreed with you about a certain situation. The word, though? Example: "Have you listened to the new Beatles record? You might still say “sock it to me.” But if you do, you might also be old. You approve of it.
Fans of the mod scene would use this shortened term for “marvelous” when they found something especially delightful, as dictionary.com explains. This was frequently heard while discussing things that were also a real bummer. Slang S-Z,

what was the slang in the 1960s

what was the slang in the 1960s


In this sentence, dig means to understand. If you’re feeling nostalgic for the 1960s, try some of these slang words out for size. It was also the name of a song by The Monkees from their 1968 film, Head. Basically, these were the “bae” of their time. According to dictionary.com, this was inspired by the iconic image of actor Humphrey Bogart with a cigarette hanging from his mouth. Slang I-M Most of what you’ll read here is unique to the sixties, some however are words or phrases that were popular in the past but took on new meanings in this decade. The 1960s, commonly known as the Sixties, was a decade beginning on January 1st, 1960 and ending on December 31st, 1969. The Rolling Stones immortalized this phrase for a fun time. e9.size = "300x250"; Read onto the NEXT page to find out what married men used to call their wives…. No one really says “sosh” anymore. This wasn’t used for splitting a check or sharing an item, but a way of saying they were going to leave wherever they were. CAFEMOM - A “bum rap” means you’re being treated unfairly, and the phrase “bummer” comes from that term. . In the 1950’s we wore circle skirts and did the twist. Michael Rich. Slang D-H A bag was what someone’s scene was, like a mod or a rocker.

Please help us improve LittleThings by taking our short survey. Thank you for subscribing to our Push Notifications, Instantly get the most heartwarming & meaningful stories. All rights reserved. 72 points - added 10 years … I still use this word!

Start using these again and see who else remembers them. John Lennon later wrote a song called “Bagism,” admonishing the phrase for pigeonholing people into stereotypes. Something that was wonderful would be "outta sight" (so great or unbelievable, you just couldn't take it all in.) (Please mention if you think it would fit better in 1960s Slang or 1950s Slang), Slang A-C Here are some of the most popular slang terms from the ’60s and what they mean: If you’ve ever heard someone say something or someone is “far out” or “out of sight”, that means the thing or person is cool. If you find someone very sexy, you might call them “foxy.”. In 1960s slang, if something is far out or "out of sight," it's meant as a compliment. It can also mean you just really like something. If they did, though, that would be very “sosh” of them. //-->, NEXT: Slang D-H 7 — and I’ve definitely used No. Nov 19, 2017. “That’s a drag” will probably be around for the long haul. Most of what you’ll read here is unique to the sixties, some however are words or phrases that were popular in the past but took on new meanings in this decade. Cool Head.

This was heard frequently on Dragnet to refer to police officers. This phrase is asking you if you understand what the person is saying. This was how you would ask someone if they agreed with you about a certain situation. The word, though? Example: "Have you listened to the new Beatles record? You might still say “sock it to me.” But if you do, you might also be old. You approve of it.
Fans of the mod scene would use this shortened term for “marvelous” when they found something especially delightful, as dictionary.com explains. This was frequently heard while discussing things that were also a real bummer. Slang S-Z,